[chou]
adverb
超[chou] can also be written as チョウ[chou] or チョー[chou] and is slang for ‘very’, ‘really’ or ‘sooooo’. It is used for emphasis. For example, if something is really funny, someone might say ‘超ウケる’ [chou ukeru]. It is similar to the term
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[geki]
adverb
激[geki] (sometimes 劇[geki])is another slang term for ‘very’, ‘really’ or ‘sooooo’. It is similar to the term
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チョン

[Chon]
noun
This is a common racial slur referring to a Korean. It has been used in Japanese since the Edo period, and is thought to be a contraction of the old Korean word for Korea, ‘Choson’. It is an offensive term, equivalent to the English slur ‘gook’.
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[naki]
noun.
This is written slang for crying. It comes from the Japanese verb ‘泣く’(naku). In comments where a person is expressing fear or sadness, you often see (泣) after a sentence. Of course, it’s also used in a more light-hearted way.
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名無しさん

[nanashi-san]
noun
Since most Japanese internet boards and forums allow anonymous posting, posters will often not have unique user names, so all that is seen is ‘名無しさん’ [nanashi-san], which means ‘Mr./Ms. Anonymous’.
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ネトウヨ

[netouyo]
noun.
This is a new word, formed through a combination of the Japanese word for ‘Internet’, インターネット(intaanetto) and ‘right wing’ 右翼 (uyoku). Both of these words are the abbreviated to form ネトウヨ (netouyo). It refers to the ‘internet right-wing’, that is those netizens who write extremely right wing comments on news articles and online blogs. The netouyo only make up a tiny proportion of Japanese internet users.
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2ちゃん

[ni-chan]
noun
2ちゃん[ni chan] or 2ch is an abbreviation of 2チャンネル[ni channeru], the well-known Japanese internet boards, 2ch.net. It has over 600 active boards, each with a similar number of threads. Each thread can then have up to 1000 comments, all of which are anonymous. 2ch.net has a significant influence on Japanese popular culture, and has even been the source for novels, dramas, and even films.
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39

[sankyuu]
noun
39 is pronounced ‘sankyuu’, which sounds like the English ‘thank you’. So if you see ’39′ written at the end of a text message, e-mail, or internet comment, then the user is thanking someone. Also see 4649
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ウケる

[ukeru]
verb
A verb used to express something hilarious, something that goes down well, or something that someone gets a kick out of.
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うp

[uppu]
noun
This is the slang way to write ‘アップロード [appuroudo] which means ‘upload’. It combines the hiragana for ‘u’ with the roman letter ‘p’, and looks a little like the English word,’up’.
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w

[wawa]
noun.
This is written slang for laughter, and is the same as the English ‘LOL’. It comes from the Japanese word ‘笑い’ (warai). It is often seen at the end of comments as ‘wwwwwww’. The longer the string of w’s, the more the person is laughing.
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[warai]
noun.
This is another way of expressing laughter in text. It is the Chinese character for the Japanese word ‘笑い’ (warai). It’s often seen on comedy shows and in manga as well as text and e-mail. It is the same as w
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ヤバい

[yabai]
adjective
ヤバい can mean anything from ‘amazing’ to ‘awful’, although its meaning is usually obvious from the context. It is usually an exclamation, and in English slang it is quite similar to ‘shit!’ or ‘fuck!’, although not quite as crude. It is sometimes used as an adverb in the form ヤバ[yaba].
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4649

[yoroshiku]
noun
4649 is pronounced ‘yoroshiku’ and is the equivalent of ‘please’. It is used when you want to ask someone to do a favour for you. Since the number for can be pronounced, among other things, as ‘yo’ and ‘shi’, and 6 can be ‘ro’ while 9 is ’9′, 4649 is now internet slang for ‘please’. Also see 39
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