Woman Arrested For Accepting Wrong Change At Convenience Store

A woman is arrested for accepting wrong change from store cashier

On May 21, an Ishinomaki woman was arrested after walking out of a convenience store with an extra 45,000 yen [approximately $370] that the store clerk had mistakenly given her as change. Local police say that the woman knew she had received incorrect change and chose not to say anything, which amounts to fraud. The woman denies the charges, saying that she simply didn’t notice the mistake.

On 2ch.net, netizens have generally agreed that the store clerk who made the mistake should be the one held to blame. Some have even suggested that he may have been an accomplice to a deliberate theft, or that he could have colluded with police to entrap an innocent woman. In general, many seem disturbed that something as innocent as failing to double-check the amount of change you receive could lead to such dire consequences. Could this happen to you?

From Sanspo News:

Woman Arrested For Accepting an Extra ¥45,000 of Change: “I Didn’t Notice”

On May 21, the Ishinomaki office of the Miyagi prefectural police arrested a female office worker (47) from Ishinomaki on charges of fraud after she allegedly accepted the money handed to her when a store clerk accidentally gave her an extra ¥45,000 as change. According to the police, the woman is denying the charges, saying “I didn’t notice.”

On March 25, the suspect went to pay the usage fee for her cell phone at a convenience store in Ishinomaki, and allegedly left the store knowing that she had mistakenly been handed about ¥48,000 as change instead of the approximately ¥3,000 she was owed.

According to the police, the fee the woman was paying was about ¥102,000. She paid about ¥105,000, and the store clerk accidentally entered it into the register as ¥150,000.

Comments from 2ch.net:

名無しさん@1周年:

Arrest the store clerk, too.

名無しさん@1周年:

Didn’t they think it was weird to have ¥10,000 in change? ww

名無しさん@1周年:

Was a grade schooler manning the register?

名無しさん@1周年:

Did she pay ¥100,000 in coins?

名無しさん@1周年:

Have they arrested the store clerk for being a dumbass?

名無しさん@1周年:

I’m more surprised at the store clerk…

名無しさん@1周年:

The store clerk is at a level that should not be given any leeway

名無しさん@1周年:

This means that a store clerk can just trick someone into committing a crime without any risk to himself, scary

名無しさん@1周年:

The store clerk was probably an accomplice in the crime!

名無しさん@1周年:

Retarded store clerk, shoulda thought it was strange that ¥10,000 bills were coming out as change w

名無しさん@1周年:

What the hell, don’t they always need to double-check the amount of change? If they give you too little change, then it’s your responsibility, but beyond that it’s the store’s job to figure it out.

名無しさん@1周年:

They could do a sting operation like this, right? w

名無しさん@1周年:

This store clerk is shit in the first place, but this lady also can’t get away with “I didn’t notice!”

名無しさん@1周年:

The store clerk made a mistake first, so why isn’t that a crime?

名無しさん@1周年:

No, the store clerk is an accomplice here. This is some kind of new fraud technique.

名無しさん@1周年:

So if a customer you hate comes in the shop, you can use this trick on them.

名無しさん@1周年:

When I get change I just toss the coins in my wallet without counting them, so the day might come when I’m suddenly arrested by the police… What a scary world we live in. But even I count the change when it’s in bills.

名無しさん@1周年:

If we’re saying this is a crime, then the criminal is probably an amateur w

名無しさん@1周年:

Well, I’m the type who never looks to confirm the amount, so this is pretty scary.

名無しさん@1周年:

You’d be surprised at how many people just absentmindedly take their change without noticing something like this.

Share This Article
Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • Yaminah Jamison

    Is that a cell phone bill or the price of a phone? No matter what, that’s expensive.

  • Dave Park

    Although this is probably wrong of me to say, the woman should have not been arrested for accepting the money that was given to her. The store clerk made an error and she is entirely and solely responsible for it. Once the money goes from the store clerk’s hand to another’s, it is no longer the store’s money.

    • Alessio Pinna

      Well, no, that would be ridicolous. No matter what, if you are mistakenly receiving money that does not belong to you, then those money does not belong to you. Its basic common sense. Its more interesting to debate if it is a crime to keep it or give it back if you notice the error itself.

      • Dave Park

        I think on whether to give it back or not is a question of morals than it is a question of crime.

        It is common sense to give things back that do not belong to you.
        But it is the store clerk’s responsibility when the money is incorrect in the till, whether it be under or over.

      • Do not confuse morality and legality. While a country may have a common legal system, people’s morals differ from one and another.

        • Alessio Pinna

          Let’s say you have to give, for whatever reason, 100$ to a friend of yours but by mistake you give him 500$. He notices, but says nothing and keeps the money. Is it moral? Is there a single country where it would be considered moral? The fact that we are talking about a shop instead of a friends is really all that can amke the difference? If you gave the extra money to a clerk, would you find it moral for him to keep it?

          • Again, you are not only confusing morality with legality, but you insist on plowing ahead with your argument by citing examples that question the morals of a person.
            The police is put in place to protect and enforce the law.

          • Alessio Pinna

            Instead of writing vague critiques, why dont you say what, exactly, you dont agree with?

          • Do you not understand what the word vague means? Have you somehow failed to clearly read both of my comments? In both, I’ve stressed upon the fact that you are confusing morality and legality.

            I already wrote what I wanted to say in the first comment but you insisted on arguing the moral aspect of the case when in fact the discussion centered around the legal aspect of the case; whether the decision to punish the customer (old lady) for the false handling of store revenue by the clerk was a legally sound decision or not.
            The police arrest people based on whether they have broken the law; not based on whether they have questionable morals.
            It has been clearly reported that the clerk admitted to handing over incorrect change to the customer. As the clerk is an employee of the store and is in-charge of handling the cash inflow and outflow; the discussion deals with whether the customer should be pulled up for the clerk’s fault and incompetence.

            Keep trolling @Alessio Pinna. I won’t be wasting any more of my time trying to reason with you.

          • Alessio Pinna

            Finally. Because, dumbass, saying “do not mix X and Y” without explaining what you mean, is pretty much useless. Now that, FINALLY, you wrote something concrete i can explain myself. First than all, this sentence “While a country may have a common legal system, people’s morals differ from one and another.” is bullshit. How does that imply that the problem was only about the law or not? What does that even mean, actually? Did you mean that A country has ONE single legal system, unlike morality that variates? Dont write uncomprensible trash and then bitch when others does not understand you. That said, nice point, genius. Of course the law shall be applied. But, still, it is an interesting legal point to debate if it is a crime to keep the money or not because not all legal systems are the same. I know of nations where that action would not be a crime, because there was not the intentions of stealing and you are not (criminally) punished for keeping stuff that it is not yours, as long as that stuff is not being asked back. Thats why is interesting: to see the differences. Thats why others, here, think it is not a crime: because there are shades and details that matters, in criminal law. Not that i expect you to understand – you probably just wanted to be holier-than-thou and drop your opinion. Badly, i would say. Congratulations, you did, now fuck off.

          • 100fires

            I understood perfectly what ザンザス said (as I am sure most everyone else did who read the remarks) and agree 100 percent. It seems you are having a difficult time comprehending the point. You seem really dumb; an IQ no higher than room temperature. The world is full of loud mouthed morons like you. It gets really tiring. I wish you would all just shut up. Your opinions don’t really matter.

          • Alessio Pinna

            Have you joined the conversation just to say that? What a valuable opinion, much more precious than mine which doesn’t really matter. Oh, god; there is definitely a loud mouthed moron that should shut up here, and that’s you. Just fuck off.

          • 100fires

            Not only do your opinions not matter, but you don’t matter either. There is nothing significant about you. That’s why you keep hooping and hollering; you’re desperate to be noticed, to be taken seriously, to be considered significant….but you are not. Your next move is to predictably act like a bigger asshole than you have been.

          • Alessio Pinna

            Again, a useless addition – and yet the one clamoring for attention its me. Sure, sure. Just go back under your bridge.

          • 100fires

            I’m glad you toned it down this time. It seemed you had a habit of telling everyone to “Fuck off.” Especially when you are confused or struggling to make your own point. I refer you to your own response and final words to ザンザス.

          • Alessio Pinna

            Oh, dont worry, i still think you are a borderline troll and should fuck off. But even these 2 lines seems too much effort for an idiot like you. And, again, you had nothing to say about the topic.

          • guestt

            This happens all the time around the world, why single her out? I about when a store gives you less money than they should can i have them arrested? If the man in the store says it was a mistake, does it change the verdict?…

  • Claude

    Arrested? C’mon now, that’s a bit excessive. Although in Japan if you drag a shitty old bike out of the trash and you are caught riding it, you can be arrested for property theft. Perhaps it’s a zero tolerance policy so crime doesn’t spread Singapore style or maybe the cops just dont have anything else to do and need to meet their quotas.

  • B

    Stupid, sick culture.

    • guest

      it’s not culture,just stupid law.

  • vonskippy

    People should add an extra 10 yen to their annual income/resident tax and then have the government arrested.

  • Balkan

    How is this even possible?

  • Hiz Oku

    she spent about ¥102000 on a cell phone bill? thats around $820… thats crazy ._.

  • Smith_90125

    Whatever happened to honesty?

    All the blather on this story is about “responsibility” and “fraud” instead of criticizing the customer for a lack of any decency. If I clerk gave me the wrong change (e.g. gave me a 10000yen note instead of a 1000yen) I wouldn’t hesitate to point out the person’s mistake.

    The woman definite did know and should be charged. There’s no way she didn’t know it was a mistake. Who spends that sort of money and doesn’t notice the amounts, doesn’t check the receipt?

    • John Doberman

      oh you are so very very honest, we’re sure.
      bully for you. dishonesty on the other hand is not a crime.
      ergo, the topic.

  • John Doberman

    It happened to me once, that at a coffee shop I went to pay with a 10,000 yen bill, and the cashier rung in 100,000 yen. It was a laugh, but as there is no denomination greater than a 10,000 yen bill it is beyond idiotic to not notice that there has never been a valid instance of more than 9,999 yen change in cash for a cash transaction, ever.

    Talk about robots, brain farts, what have you. The one should not be behind a register and the other… what can you say? If she took it as a gift, said thank you, and left, we can’t call this any more of a crime than the system of education that has rendered a generation unable to calculate change and recognize obvious errors. Really surprised this business and employee weren’t a bit more embarrassed at their stupidity. Take it out of his pay.

Personals @ chinaSMACK - Meet people, make friends, find lovers? Don't be so serious!»